City of Rochester Updates Water and Sewer Rates

As proposed by the City’s Infrastructure Committee and staff, on August 13, Rochester’s City Council approved updating residential and commercial sewer and water rates effective September 1, while also recommending that the City schedule a water rate study in 2019. The approved changes are attributable to increases from the Oakland County Water Resource Commission (OCWRC), the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA), and operating and capital costs.

Starting on September 1, the city-wide sewer rate will increase from $3.15/per 100 cubic feet (cf) to $3.28/per 100 cubic feet (cf), with the ready-to-serve fee also having a pass-through increase of 4.2%. These increases equate approximately to between $6.39 to $318.78 more per quarter for the average residential and commercial consumer.

Running water faucet

Water and Sewer Rates

Depending on the water source, residents and businesses will see the following increases:

  • Effective September 1, 2018, the GLWA water rates, which decreased last year, will increase from $4.84/per 100 cubic feet (cf) to $4.98/per 100 cubic feet (cf), with the ready-to-serve rate to increase slightly to $5.45/MEU. This increased rate is still below the 2016 rate of $5.24/per 100 cubic feet (cf). The 2018 increase equates to between $3.76 to $10.66 more per quarter for the average residential consumer.
  • Effective September 1, 2018, the Well water rates will increase from $0.89/per 100 cubic feet (cf) to $0.99/per 100 cubic feet (cf), with the ready-to-serve rate to increase slightly to $8.33/MEU. The 2018 increase equates to between $4.43 to $12.83 more per quarter for the average residential consumer.

Residents and businesses are encouraged to try the following conservation options and other tips to help reduce their sewer and water use, which should also reduce their future bills:

  • Check for leaks. Water leaks are expensive and knowing your usage is critical to recognizing when your money is running down the drain. Check your meter for the Leak Alarm icon. If water is continually passing through the meter for a 24-hour period, the Leak Alarm icon will be present on the water meter screen. Visit the City’s website to learn how to read your water meter.
  • Install an irrigation meter.
  • Replace your water thirsty turf with a lower maintenance option.
  • Decrease your “Peak Hour” demand by watering your lawn during non-peak periods from 12:00(Midnight) to 5:00am to reduce capital investment and energy costs. These simple, proactive changes in watering habits can offset future rate increases.

Comments

  1. Kay Johnson says:

    If the City had been pro active for the last 15 years and been maintaining our streets and water/sewer system this would not have happened. Our water bills would have increased in smaller amounts – not like the huge bills we are now receiving. What is the City’s preventative maintenance program for every department in the City? Does the City even have a plan???? I would like to see or hear a plan from a different Department at every Council Meeting year around. Lets start with the DPW’s plan to paint the lines on the streets before it gets to cold to paint before winter arrives. In the 80’s and 90’s water/sewer/streets were replaced in a timely fashion – not only when they broke. If the City stopped this program just to keep taxes lower – it didn’t work and that is not the way a City should do business. It is not how I take care of my home – something should be done every year to improve things and keep things in good running order.
    One more item – all kinds of signs (way to many in my opinion) have been put up all over the City – has added help been hired to trim the brush and generally take care of them so they can be read? Last time I looked the sign on University about City Hall can’t be seen due to trees that need trimming.

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