Interactions Between Arab-American Community and First Responders

Oakland University to Present Lecture on Interactions Between Arab-American Community and First Responders

Jamal Aliah, director of Intelligence Matters, LLC., will present a hands-on lecture on the legal and cultural issues surrounding interactions between the Arab-American community and first responders on Monday, September 11 at Oakland University.

The lecture will take place from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Gold Rooms at the Oakland Center, 312 Meadow Brook Road.

Oakland University is among 20 colleges and universities nationwide to receive the grant

Oakland University is among 20 colleges and universities nationwide to receive the grant

“Mr. Aliah’s talk is an excellent opportunity to raise awareness of the importance of effective cross-cultural training for all professionals that work directly with the Arab-American community,” said Adolfo Campoy-Cubillo, Ph.D., an associate professor of Spanish in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at Oakland University.

A retired and decorated 20-year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Aliah is considered an expert on Middle East affairs and counterterrorism. He was awarded the CIA’s Career Commendation Medal, the Career Service Medal, the Intelligence Medal of Merit, the Award for Innovative Operations, and 12 exceptional performance awards.

In addition, Aliah is a CIA-certified instructor. He has trained more than 3,000 federal law enforcement officers on homeland security issues and intelligence.

“Mr. Aliah’s presentation promotes understanding of Arabic culture and Islam as it informs the daily lives of citizens and non-citizens, civilians and law enforcement professionals,” Campoy-Cubillo said.

“From understanding the structure and relations with extended Arab American families to mediating issues concerning religious identity and freedom of speech, this lecture helps students and the community to understand the role of law enforcement in facilitating harmonious intercultural coexistence,” he added.

According to Lori Posey, development associate for Oakland University’s College of Arts and Sciences, the lecture is made possible through the Hajja Razia Sharif Sheikh Endowment for Islamic Understanding Programs, which supports programs that educate students and the community about Islam and promotes understanding of Islam through educational means.

“This endowment was established in honor of the late Hajja Razia Sharif Sheikh, a native of Lahore, Pakistan, who – although schooled traditionally at home – held a strong belief in formal education and encouraged her eight children to pursue college studies; three of whom became practicing physicians,” she said.

Admission to the lecture is free and the event is open to the public.

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