Women’s History Lecture Series at the Rochester Hills Museum

Women’s History Lecture Series Thursdays in March

Members Free; Non-Members $5; 7:00 p.m.

Pre-register via Pay Pal at www.rochesterhills.org/musprograms, by emailing rhmuseum@rochesterhills.org or by calling 248-656-4663.

Women unload a person on a stretcher from a WWI vehicle

At Home and Over There: American Women Physicians in World War I

March 14: At Home and Over There:  American Women Physicians in World War I presented by the American Women’s Medical Association

The Museum is proud to share the American Medical Women’s Association exhibition and documentary that celebrate the contributions of women who,  despite the capabilities equal to their male colleagues, were not permitted the same military rank and privilege. Unable to surmount these barriers, they still made lasting contributions to the war efforts. AMWA has produced this video to highlight the contributions of these unsung heroes.

Outside view of Van Hoosen Hall

Buildings of MSU and the Women they Honor

March 21: Buildings of MSU and the Women they Honor  presented by Megan Badgley-Malone

Many buildings at Michigan State University bear the name of women, but  seldom are the stories of these women heard. Megan Badgley-Malone will share these stories including that of Van Hoosen Hall.

Bessie Coleman

Bessie Coleman

March 28: Women Who Changed America by Marie Papciak

Marie Papciak transforms into two women who changed America and tells their stories in first person. Join us for this HERstory presentation to “meet” Bessie Coleman and Laura Smith Haviland. Bessie Coleman was the first woman pilot of African-American descent and the first of Native American descent. Her pioneering was an inspiration to early pilots and to those in the communities of her heritage.

Laura Smith Haviland

Laura Smith Haviland

Laura Smith Haviland was an abolitionist, suffragette and temperance worker who lived in Lenawee County in the Michigan Territory. She was part of the community group that organized the first anti-slavery organization in Michigan in 1832. She also opened the first racially integrated school in Michigan. Her home was the first Underground Railroad station in Michigan.

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